Archives For OS Disk

mind-the-gap

Based on the current builds, compared to Server, Nano Server has 93 percent lower VHD size, 92 percent fewer critical bulletins and 80 percent fewer reboots!

Deploying Nano Server to Azure

I’ve been curious about Nano Server for a while now. And I recently noticed that it was available on Microsoft Azure. This post is definitely from a developers point-of-view. It goes through the steps required to create a functional Nano Server Virtual Machines (VM) on Microsoft Azure.

Nano Server is ideal for many scenarios:

  • As a “compute” host for Hyper-V virtual machines, either in clusters or not
  • As a storage host for Scale-Out File Server.
  • As a DNS server
  • As a web server running Internet Information Services (IIS)
  • As a host for applications that are developed using cloud application patterns and run in a container or virtual machine guest operating system.

The Adventure

Nano Server is a remotely administered server operating system (OS). Wait. Let me repeat this because it’s important… Nano Server is a remotely administered server operating system (OS). Developers, Nano Server is a server OS optimized for clouds and data centers. It’s designed to take up far less disk space, to setup significantly faster, and to require far fewer restarts than Windows Server. So why does this matter? Well it means more resources, more availability and stability for our Apps. And it also means that it’s time to learn new skills, because there is no local logon capability at all, nor does it support Terminal Services. However, we have a wide variety of options for managing Nano Server remotely, including Windows PowerShell, Windows Management Instrumentation (WMI), Windows Remote Management, and Emergency Management Services (EMS). Continue Reading…

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Can’t Delete an Azure Resource Group

Recently, I hit a wall. I wasn’t able to delete my Azure Resource Groups and got quite frustrated… I’m writing this post, with hopes that you may save some time, frustration and energy with your ongoing challenge. Continue Reading…

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Disk UUIDs and Linux on Azure

I recently ran a few tests to figure out how UUIDs behave on Azure when we capture VM Images, copy VHDs, move Virtual Machines and re-provision them in different data centers. Continue Reading…

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Moving to a New Azure Datacenter

From time to time, I face interesting challenges. Azure is an exciting platform, because it’s pushing me to learn about things that I wouldn’t of dreamed of a few years back.

This post is all about moving a CentOS Virtual Machine that has a RAID 0 to a new Microsoft Azure Datacenter. Continue Reading…

multi-geo

While I was playing around with the Azure Resource Manager Copy Operation, I started thinking about what I could do with it. The first wild idea that popped into my head was, to use it to deploy multi-geo environments from a single ARM Template.

Alright, some of you might think that it’s not such great idea, and I can appreciate that. But I’m just too curious, so let’s give this a chance. Continue Reading…

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Creating a CentOS VM Using ARM

Docker and Open Source projects are getting lots of attention, so I decided that it was time for me to build a Linux Virtual Machine on Microsoft Azure. This post is all about creating an Azure Resource Manager Template for a CentOS Virtual Machine with two stripped Data Disks. This template should be used as a starting point and may require some tweaking to meet your needs. Feel free to share your thoughts by using the comment section. Continue Reading…

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In my last blog post I shared about how I use a Microsoft Azure Virtual Machine as my development machine. It’s been a month since I made this drastic change, and I must admit that it’s been pretty cool! The Azure Virtual Machine has provided me with more agility in my hectic schedule. I’ve been able to start my day from one machine, move to a different machine and continue from where I left off. I no longer deal with putting my machine to sleep or trying to remember where I was when I left off. When I log off from one machine, I log back in right where I left off.

It’s Getting Tight

As I move from project to project, the resource requirements vary, and sometimes I need more resources. Fortunately, we can scale our Virtual Machines up and down through PowerShell and the Azure Portal. Continue Reading…